Teachify Teacher Chit-Chat Sport

Teachify Teacher Chit-Chat Sport

Clases de inglés en empresas

Focus, keep your eye on the ball and get ready to perform because after a long time out of action over summer, our monthly topic-based chitchats are back!  

What is a chit-chat?

Well, to refresh your memory, a chitchat is an informal discussion and we believe that listening to engaging discussions is a great way of maintaining interest in learning a language while perfecting your understanding, pronunciation, vocabulary and so much more. 

What did we talk about?

So in today’s chitchat, Mickey and Lewis discuss the monthly topic that we based some of our classes on in September. 

We thought that after putting on some weight after a few too many beers on the beach we would analyse a number of different sport topics, among those the Olympic games, sports betting and the financial situation of modern football. 

Make sure you concentrate on the spoken language being used and if possible, repeat what we say out loud so your neighbours hear you speaking like a native.

Learn as if you were to live forever.

Mahatma Gandhi

Where can I learn the phrasal verbs?

To begin with, we give a couple of examples of some common sport-related phrasal verbs. 

Pass out and bulk up were the first two.   

If you’d like to see even more examples, why don’t you check out our previous blog listing ten sport phrasal verbs?

After that we have a short discussion about the ‘night race’ that we ran and how we’re training with the view to potentially running a marathon in Malaga before the end of the year. 

Here we actually gave two more examples of racing phrasal verbs, fall behind and then catch up.  I know, we’re on fire!

Can you remember what Mickey has given up?

During our chat about running long distances and competing in races, Mickey told us that he ran the Malaga half marathon years ago because he did it for a £10 bet. 

This provided a good platform for us to move on to talk about sports betting and our opinions on this now controversial industry with so many adverts on TV.

With the current theme of phrasal verbs related to sport, we added an extra one given that we were speaking about addictions and being addicted to gambling or sports betting. 

In this case we’re not going to write it down, we’d like you to pay attention and see if you can guess it.  Mickey, have you _____ __ anything recently?  I have _____ ___ smoking.

What phrasal verb could it be then?

Here’s a clue, a synonym of this verb is ‘to quit.’

Clases de inglés en empresas

Oh, and pay attention to Mickey when he says what football team he supports. 

Bearing in mind that we recorded the video on the 1st of October, he reminded us that his team were going to play against Bayern Munich. 

If any of you are football fans I’m sure you can imagine how Mickey is feeling at the moment. 

That’ll be enough for today folks, we hope you’ve enjoyed watching our chitchat and reading the corresponding blog. 

Just remember, that every day is a school day and every day you learn something new! 

Widen Your Vocabulary with 10 Sports-Related​ Phrasal Verbs

Widen Your Vocabulary with 10 Sports Related Phrasal Verbs

Clases de inglés negocios Sevilla

As Sports is our Topic of the month for September, we thought that we would share some of our favourite Sports related phrasal verbs.

Many of these phrasal verbs are particularly useful as they can be used in other contexts other than talking about sports.

So the next time you are chatting with your English friends about the football match last night you can impress them with some of these phrasal verbs!

What we learned in our English class?

Work Out: To do exercise.

Eg, yesterday I went to work out at the gym

Work Off: to burn calories or food consumed.

Eg, I need to work off all that Christmas food!

Fall Behind: Begin to lose in a race

Eg, he was winning until he fell behind at the 3rd mile 

Slim Down: To lose weight

Eg, Sheila needs to slim down so that she can fit into her wedding dress.

Take Up: To start doing a new sport or activity

Eg, This summer I want to take up cross fit.

Wait! Here are 5 more..

Try Out For: To Audition for a team

Eg, You’re so good at football, you should try out for the team!

Knock Out: to punch somebody unconscious (usually used in Boxing)

Eg, The boxer knocked out his opponent in the 5th round.

Alternatively Knock Out can also be used to mean that a loser in a tournament is eliminated.

Eg, England were knocked out of the world cup in the semi finals against Croatia.

Catch Up: Reach an opponent in a race.

Eg, After spending most of the race in last place, Tom finally caught up to the rest of the runners in the last 100m.  

Pass Out: To become unconscious.

Eg, I was so exhausted after the marathon that I passed out.

Bulk Up: to gain muscle.

Eg, I’ve been lifting weights at the gym recently so I can bulk up and impress the ladies.

Jack’s Music Box

Jack's Music Box

Courtney Barnett – Depreston

It’s been a while but we are finally back with another Jack’s Music Box, the best Music/English teaching blog series available this side of the Guadalquivir. This week we are looking at Depreston by Australian singer songwriter Courtney Barnett.

Clases de inglés in-company

Nuevos Cursos

Originally a guitarist in Australian bands like Rapid Transit and Immigrant Union before becoming a solo star, Barnett first garnered international attention with the release of her 2012 EP I’ve Got  A Friend Called Emily Ferris along with her 2013 double EP A Sea of Split Peas.

Barnett went onto achieve widespread critical attention with her debut album Sometimes I Sit and Think and Sometimes I Just Sit in 2015.

Intensivos de inglés Sevilla

I chose Depreston for this week’s song as it is a good introduction to Courtney Barnett’s unique style as she often sings in her typical Australian accent in a very conversational way.

The song is about buying a bungalow in Preston, a dreary suburb of Melbourne.

Enjoy!

Cursos de inglés Sevilla

Interesting Vocabulary

Percolator: A pot used for brewing coffee

Bungalow: A one storey house.

Cul De Sac: A dead end residential street.

It’s Going Pretty Cheap: It’s selling for pretty cheap.

Deceased Estate: A dead person’s house.

The Lyrics

You said we should look out further, I guess it wouldn’t hurt us

We don’t have to be around all these coffee shops
Now we’ve got that percolator, never made a latte greater
I’m saving twenty three dollars a week

We drive to a house in Preston, we see police arresting
A man with his hand in a bag
How’s that for first impressions? This place seems depressing
It’s a Californian bungalow in a cul-de-sac

It’s got a lovely garden, a garage for two cars to park in
Or a lot of room for storage if you’ve just got one
And it’s going pretty cheap you say, well it’s a deceased estate
Aren’t the pressed metal ceilings great?

Then I see the handrail in the shower, a collection of those canisters for coffee tea and flour
And a photo of a young man in a van in Vietnam
And I can’t think of floorboards anymore, whether the front room faces south or north
And I wonder what she bought it for

If you’ve got a spare half a million
You could knock it down and start rebuilding

If you’ve got a spare half a million
You could knock it down and start rebuilding

If you’ve got a spare half a million
You could knock it down and start rebuilding

If you’ve got a spare half a million
You could knock it down and start rebuilding

If you’ve got a spare half a million
You could knock it down and start rebuilding

If you’ve got a spare half a million
You could knock it down and start rebuilding

If you enjoyed the song check out our Teachify Courtney Barnett playlist below!

See you again for another installment of Jack’s Music Box.

Academia de inglés Sevilla

Teachify Teacher Chit-Chat Love

Teachify Teacher Chit-Chat Love

Clases de inglés negocios Sevilla

It would appear that love has indeed been in the air at Teachify in May as we’ve been discussing a number of topics to do with romance, dating, marriage and many more.  You may think of the mythical Bob Marley and wonder in his famous words…is this love, is this love, is this love.  Well, here at Teachify for one month only, yes, it is love. 

What is the topic of the month?

So, just to clarify, each month we take inspiration from a general topic and then we focus on said topic by discussing many aspects, reviewing relevant vocabulary and debate some of the most interesting questions we consider related to that topic.  After that, we wrap everything up by having a quick chitchat to go through how we feel when it comes to that topic. 

Profesores particulares Sevilla

What should you do now then?

The answer is right before your eyes, it’s a no-brainer. 

If you’re already one of our students and you’ve studied some of the lesson plans then I’d begin by trying to recall the target vocabulary, phrasal verbs and idioms. 

Then the next logical step is to watch the chitchat attached and if you have any issues understanding anything we say, I suggest rewatching the video as many times as possible until you master the new terms. 

At the same time, you could use applications like wordreference, reverso or linguee to check the meaning and translation of these difficult words. 

Clases de inglés negocios Sevilla

It's okay! we know it can be difficult to understand.

In case that’s not enough, or if you simply want to see some synonyms or further explanation then don’t worry, below you have a list of the words and phrases we believe to be more unusual along with a brief explanation in English. 

Vocabulary & phrasal verbs

  • Love at first sight: falling in love with someone the moment you meet them.
  • Shallow: the opposite of deep, or someone who only focuses on someone’s appearance.
  • Never judge a book by its cover: don’t make a decision about someone if you don’t know them.
  • Fancy: to want, to find attractive or as an adjective it means posh or extravagant.
  • Cut corners: to not do things properly.
  • Woo: to flirt with or conquer romantically.
  • Intrigued: interested, curious.
  • Bound to: guaranteed to or at least almost guaranteed to.
  • Fallout: argument or fight.
  • Fall out with: have an argument with someone.
  • Make up: a very versatile phrasal verb however in the video and talking about love it means to forgive someone or make peace with someone.
  • Do your make up: apply make-up.

Teachify Teacher Chit-Chat Work

Teachify Teacher Chit-Chat Work

Welcome back to our blog, I’m sure you’ve been looking forward to watching another of our Teacher chitchats, so here we are.  You’re probably aware of the fact that every month we focus on one main topic and we like to finish it off by having a chat about what we’ve been discussing. 

What did we learn last month?

Last month we looked at a wide range of aspects related to the world of work.  Therefore, Mickey and I have got together to ask each other a few questions about work. 

By watching the video you can find out what we did in our first ever jobs, what our dream jobs were when we were younger and even hear an embarrassing story that happened to one of us at a leaving party. 

It’s worth the wait, so make sure you watch the video right until the end.  

How can I use the video to learn English?

At times we speak quite quickly and use some difficult words and phrases, you can find a list of these tough pieces of language below along with a brief explanation of what they mean.

However, I challenge you to watch the video without looking at these explanations, at least the first time you watch it. 

Repetition is extremely important in order for you to memorise difficult vocabulary so don’t just watch it once, keep going until you’re sick of hearing our voices. 

So, without further ado, click on the video and enjoy! 

I wonder whether you’ll get the terrible jokes we tell at the start. 

Fingers crossed.

Did you understand the Teachify chit-chat?

Don’t worry if not! Here’s a list of the difficult words and phrases with their explanations.

  • Scarecrow – an object made to resemble a human figure and scare birds away from a field where crops are.
  • Get promoted – receive a promotion a work.
  • Get straight to the point – focus on the main issue.
  • Beat around the bush – avoid the main issue.
  • Trimmed – cut, bushes and trees can be trimmed, as can your hair.
  • Handyman – a person who is employed to carry out domestic repairs or minor renovations.
  • Pocket money – a small amount of money given to a child by their parents, an allowance.
  • Newsagents – a shop selling newspapers, magazines, sweets and drinks.
  • A tenner – £10 or ten quid.
  • Back in the day – a long time ago, referring to a particular period of time.
  • Run into someone – meet or see someone unexpectedly.
  • Shave off (milliseconds) – reduce a time recorded by a tiny amount.
  • Paperwork – routine work involving written documents.
  • Sweat – exude moisture in heat, nervous situations or when doing exercise, perspiration.
  • Slide – move smoothly along a surface while maintaining continuous contact with it.
  • Soaking wet – extremely wet.
  • Leaving do – a party to say goodbye, often at work or if you are moving away.
  • Low-key – not elaborate, showy or intensive.